Bronte’s Farewell

It’s an elegant inheritance of a poem by one of the famous Bronte sisters; this is Anne’s work “Farewell”. It’s usually associated  with the death of a loved one. However, it can also be applied to the voluntary surrender of a once cherished love, a parting of ways.
Couple saying goodbye before car travel
Farewell by Anne Bronte
Farewell to thee! but not farewell
To all my fondest thoughts of thee:
Within my heart they still shall dwell;
And they shall cheer and comfort me.
O, beautiful, and full of grace!
If thou hadst never met mine eye,
I had not dreamed a living face
Could fancied charms so far outvie.
If I may ne’er behold again
That form and face so dear to me,
Nor hear thy voice, still would I fain
Preserve, for aye, their memory.
That voice, the magic of whose tone
Can wake an echo in my breast,
Creating feelings that, alone,
Can make my tranced spirit blest.
That laughing eye, whose sunny beam
My memory would not cherish less; —
And oh, that smile! whose joyous gleam
Nor mortal language can express.
Adieu, but let me cherish, still,
The hope with which I cannot part.
Contempt may wound, and coldness chill,
But still it lingers in my heart.
And who can tell but Heaven, at last,
May answer all my thousand prayers,
And bid the future pay the past
With joy for anguish, smiles for tears?

What I have to say regards if you’ve ever been touched by someone as much as Anne’s poem suggests. It concerns the opportunity to reconsider staying or leaving.
If you have absorbed his/her spirit in such ways, you are blessed. It means that he/she was selfless enough to do so.

Technology has allowed us to reach more people, but it doesn’t mean that we’ve improved relating to or caring for others. It merely means that we have chances to draw bigger audiences to indulge in and admire our favorite topic-The All Important Me, Me, Me.


If you found a spirit who has imprinted your heart that deeply, within these modern days of gross intimate starvation, and your bidding them good bye is a voluntary decision.. maybe it’s best for you to turn back around.

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